These Are Brian Griffin’s 14 Best Moments From ‘Family Guy’

Entertainment

He was a hopeless alcoholic, a subpar writer, a womanizer, and all too often a pretentious jerk. But Brian, the Griffin family dog in the long-running animated series Family Guy, provided an anchor for his masters like no dog could — enduring Peter, supporting Lois, educating Chris, encouraging Meg, and raising Stewie.

Creator Seth McFarlane and the Family Guy crew put an end to all that Sunday night, when their latest episode ended in Brian’s gruesome death from being hit by a car. He was 8 — in dog years. Executive producer Steve Callaghan told E! that the writers saw getting rid of a cast member as “a fun way to shake things up.”

“It seemed more in the realm of reality that a dog would get hit by a car, than if one of the kids died,” Callaghan said. “As much as we love Brian, and as much…

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Twitter feedback to inapt USA TODAY headline highlights media dynamics

USA TODAY edited a story on the Thor sequel’s victory against The Best Man Holiday, a sequel that received more box office attention than analysts expected, multiple times Sunday after negative Twitter feedback.

USA TODAY possesses a more engaging Twitter following than most due to its interactive habits and today was no exception.

Continue reading “Twitter feedback to inapt USA TODAY headline highlights media dynamics”

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie: The danger of a single story

“All of these stories make me who I am. But to insist on only these negative stories is to flatten my experience, and to overlook the many other stories that formed me. The single story creates stereotypes. And the problem with stereotypes is not that they are untrue, but that they are incomplete. They make one story become the only story.”

Chimamanda Adichie has instantly jumped into my heart as one of the best writers in this generation. I’m already planning to read at least one of her books this summer.

Restructure!

We are multifaceted.

And stories in which we neither suffer nor resist are just as authentic. They are a part of our daily lives.

(Click on “View subtitles” to turn on the subtitles.)

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